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Unravelled Development

Performance tuning stored procedures - when indexes aren't the problem

Recently I have been doing performance tuning on a few stored procedures that power some of the most important parts of DrDoctor. Whilst I’m confident to say I can read query execution plans much better now that I could 6 months ago that isn’t the biggest takeaway. What I’ve noticed with two stored procedures in particular is that the reason they are running slowly is because they were both reading lots and lots of data from one or two tables which was then slowly whittled away into practically nothing.

Getting out of "a variable nightmare" - or how I learnt to let go and embrace conventions

I’ve recently been doing some work automating the release of our integration projects to our various clients, I was reviewing the work that had been done last week and noticed that there were a lot of variables being defined. If we continued on this course as we added new clients we would end up adding between 3-5 new variables, multiple that by say 100 new clients and soon we would have an incredible amount of variables to deal with.

Distributed multi-tenanted releases with Octopus Deploy

TL;DR; read the Octopus guidance, adopt the “environment per tenant” approach, try to make your process consistent across tenants and use scoped variables to make steps re-usable, keep complexity out. In my last couple of posts I’ve written about the various aspects involved with automating the release of our client integration projects. I’ve shown how to get TeamCity to build Integration Services projects and then how to deploy them into SQL Server SSIS Catalog with Octopus Deploy.

Deploying SSIS projects with Octopus Deploy

In my previous blog post I outlined how to configure TeamCity to build SQL Server Integration Services projects and then package the ispac file into a NuGet package. In this post I’m going to show how I set up Octopus Deploy to deploy the ispac to SQL Server 2012 and configure SSIS DB projects and environments. Deployment Overview Here is an overview of the process as is currently defined in Octopus Deploy.

Building and packaging SQL Server Integration Services projects in TeamCity

At DrDoctor we’ve been using Octopus Deploy for about a year and half now, and in that time we have developed a very robust way of releasing the core of our system. That is, two IIS websites and a bunch of windows services. Release automation has vastly increased the frequency at which we release software into production and in turn the speed at which the business can operate. The missing part in all of this are the integration projects, when DrDoctor begins working with a new hospital we do a bunch of work integrating their PAS system into our system.

Applying custom settings with Octopus Deploy

If you’re a .Net developer and not currently doing automated deployments then you really should be. If you’d like some help getting started send me a message in the comments and I’ll drop you an email. The core of any deployment is the ability to easily manage and apply configuration values, across environments and across your different apps/web apps. Octopus Deploy has first class support for managing variables, including setting different scopes or environments and steps in your deployment process.